September 21, 2020

It’s alive! Space station’s humanoid robot awake

0
0



Pin It

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — NASA’s humanoid robot has finally awakened in space.

Ground controllers turned Robonaut on Monday for the first time since it was delivered to the in February. The test involved sending power to all of Robonaut’s systems. The robot was not commanded to move; that will happen next week.

“Those electrons feel GOOD! One small step for man, one giant leap for tinman kind,” Robonaut posted in a Twitter update. (All right, so a Robonaut team member actually posted Monday’s tweets under AstroRobonaut.)

The four visible light cameras that serve as Robonaut’s eyes turned on in the gold-colored head, as did the infrared camera, located in the robot’s mouth and needed for depth perception. One of Robonaut’s tweets showed the view inside the American lab, Destiny.

“Sure wish I could move my head and look around,” Robonaut said in the tweet.

Robonaut — the first humanoid robot in space — is being tested as a possible astronaut’s helper.

The robot’s handlers at Mission Control in Houston cheered as everything came alive. The main computers — buried inside Robonaut’s stomach — kicked on, as did the more than 30 processors embedded in the arms for controlling the joints.

“Robonaut behaved himself,” said deputy project manager . “Oh, Robonaut definitely got an ‘A.’ He won’t be held back a grade, if that’s what you want to know.”

“It was just very exciting,” he said. “It’s been a long time coming to get this thing turned on.”

The robot was delivered on space shuttle Discovery’s final flight. It took this long for the operating software to get up there, and for the astronauts to have enough time to help with the experiment

On Sept. 1, controllers will command Robonaut to move its fingers, hands and arms.

“It’s been asleep for about a year, so it kind of has to stretch out a little bit,” Radford told The Associated Press. “Just like a crew member has to kind of acclimate themselves to zerogravity, our robot has to do a very similar thing, kind of wiggle itself and learn how it needs to move” in weightlessness.

For now, Robonaut exists from the waist up. It measures 3 feet 4 inches tall and weighs 330 pounds. Each arm is 2 feet 8 inches long.

A pair of legs currently are being designed and should be launched in 2013.

 

PHOTO: Astronaut Scott Kelly, Expedition 26 commander, right, poses with Robonaut 2, the dexterous humanoid astronaut helper, in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station.

The sun-powered robotic explorer is heading toward Jupiter on a fresh quest to discover the secret recipe for making planets.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

Speak Your Mind

*